Fool’s Gold 2014

Race Summary
10th place in the men’s open category, 12th place overall with two very fast singlespeeders (Gordon Wadsworth and AJ Linnell) finishing ahead of me. It would have been three singlespeeders finishing ahead of me, except Bob Moss got a flat mid-race. I passed him while he was changing his flat, but then he passed me again a couple hours later. With just a couple miles left to race, I caught and passed him again to finish 12th overall and 10th in the men’s open category. Perhaps the biggest highlight of the race for me was the Bull Gap descent and singletrack. It really clicked with me how to ride the berms both big and small throughout the doubletrack and singletrack portions of the descent knocking nearly 5 minutes off a six mile section of trail.

My finishing time was also 5 minutes faster, but it came through a much steadier pacing of my effort. I did the opening climb almost 5 minutes slower than 2012 – which means that I shaved at least 10 minutes off the more technical portions of the course … with the last 60 miles stuck in my big chainring. I missed a shift and bent the front derailleur cage so that it wouldn’t shift back down into the little chainring. I thought about stopping and trying to bend it back, but I realized that I was pushing myself much harder when I was forced to stay in the big chainring. The only time I really missed it was the few super steep sections which I just got off and ran up.

Race Highlights

  • One of the things that I love about mountain bike racing is the creek crossings. When you get caught up in a road season – a lot of times you forget about the fun of a legitimate creek crossing … i.e., enter the creek at full speed and the splash reaches above your head soaking you completely. Also, if you don’t make it all the way across, you are submerged at least up to your knee if not up to your hip or higher. Fool’s Gold didn’t disappoint – even with a really dry course this year. The creek crossings were DEEP.
  • Really deep field – Jeremiah Bishop, Tinker Juarez, Gerry Pflugg, Gordon Wadsworth, Rob Spreng, and a LOT of other strong racers.
  • Just seeing so many people I haven’t seen since Cohutta with my accident wiping out all the ultracx and mountain bike races I had wanted to do.
  • Singletrack fun … first time riding singletrack since Cohutta.

Race Data
HR summaryZone summary … not much time spent in Zone 5, but a TON of time spent in Zone 4.
Annotated HR plotAnnotated HR plot (click to enlarge)

September 26, 2014 at 10:19 pm 2 comments

Alabama Road Race State Championship

Pro/1/2 podium – Left to right – Said Assali (Shama Cycles), Me (Friends of the Great Smokies), and David Potter (Infinity Racing/Tom Williams BMW-Mini).

I’m super happy to take the win today in the Alabama state road race in Elkmont up near the border of Tennessee. We had a small 1/2 field combined with the 3s and the Masters for a grand total of maybe 15-20 people in the race. This led to interesting team dynamics with team members spread across different fields, but there wasn’t a whole lot of choice for the officials given the small turnout. The race organizers did something awesome I’ve never seen before in 20 years of racing … they handed out black ribbons at the start for us to wear in honor of James Keith Green who was killed earlier this week bicycling in Lauderdale County not far from the race course. Given my accident earlier in the year, it meant a lot for me to be able to cross the line solo holding up the ribbon as a tribute to someone who was not as fortunate as I was.

The race itself played out differently than I had imagined … I was hoping for a break, which did happen — but not in the way I would have expected. On the first lap, there were a few attacks, but everything stayed together with everyone being fresh. Then across the top of the plateau after the first climb on the second lap, Said Assali and David Potter rolled off the front. I was near the front so I attacked to bridge across thinking that I would probably just pull the field up with me. Instead, I got away solo and when I caught up to them went flying by saying “let’s go, this is it”.

Sure enough, by the time the field started chasing we had already hit 53 mph on the steep descent off the plateau. We had maybe a 15-20 second gap as we started up the steeper longer second climb. I was thinking that somebody from the field might bridge across to us, but we stayed away to the top and then started really rolling well into the headwind part of the course. A few miles later, it seemed pretty clear that we were going to stay away. For the next 30 miles or so, we worked well together until I attacked at the entrance of the roubaix portion of the course (Robinson Rd – a mix of pavement and gravel and potholes).

I was hoping to reduce the break from 3 to 2, but both Said and David had no problem holding my wheel. The end of that section immediately transitions into the first climb. I hit it hard again … again hoping to get away with just one other rider … but both Said and David came off my pace, which meant I would have to push it HARD for the next 12 miles to the end of the lap if I was going to stay away for the win. Fortunately, I was able to hold them off for the win!

Here’s my annotated heartrate and power data:

Annotated heartrate plot (click to enlarge)Annotated heartrate plot (click to enlarge)

hrsumm Heartrate zone summary.

Also, I’ve linked to my shifting data (specifically lap 6) from the race. One of the things that I learned from the 24 hour race was that I tended to shift into easier gears when I started to get tired. So when I started to get tired on my solo break late in the race and my power started to drop well below threshold, I would shift down into a harder gear for a bit and pick up the pace. This plays out in the data as more frequent shifting on lap 6 as opposed to lap 5, which was entirely in the 3 man break. 11.6 seconds between shifts on lap 6 vs 14.1 seconds per shift on lap 5.

di2dataView lap 6 shifting data on di2stats.com.

September 6, 2014 at 2:12 pm Leave a comment

Mid Atlantic 24 Hour Time Trial

Left to right – me (3rd place), Brian Jastrebsky (1st place), and Ray Brown (2nd place) after the race.

I took these screenshots of my Garmin 1000 at the farthest out point on the course a couple minutes before the clocked tick back over to 7AM Sunday morning 24 hours after starting the race at 7AM on Saturday. It seemed fitting to stop early at exactly 444 miles – the length of the Natchez Trace parkway – after last year’s #epic444 which was not only an amazing time of camaraderie and support for Team Red White and Blue, but also a first experimental step towards ultracycling. It was also fitting to be on the farthest out point of the rural course away from everybody and everything. Ultra-endurance cycling is such an intriguing mix of both solo determination and team support. That makes Ray Brown’s 2nd place finish all the more impressive as he did the event completely unsupported! Brian Jastrebsky’s 1st place win is also phenomenal given that his longest ride prior to this 24 hour race was 150 miles.

I’m skipping ahead of myself, though. How did we get to this moment in time? It all started 24 hours earlier at Washington High School in rural, flat, coastal Washington, North Carolina. How flat is it? The climbing ratio for this ride was 54:1, which means that I had to ride 54 miles to climb 100 feet. To put that in perspective, in Birmingham I frequently climb 10,000 feet in that same distance … in other words, the course was 100 times flatter than my normal routes and over 10 times flatter than my previous flattest ride (Tour of Elk Grove in Chicago). A lot of times with this kind of flat coastal terrain, you get strong coastal winds. But the course and entire area was heavily forested and sheltered from the wind. As a storm rolled in later in the day, the winds picked up to maybe 5-10mph max.

Annotated topocreator map of the course (click to enlarge)Annotated topocreator map of the course (click to enlarge)

It was an interesting mix of bikes at the start line — everything from time trial bikes with disc wheels to road bikes with clip-on TT bars and several recumbents. I think I may have been the only rider doing it Mercx style with no TT bars – but I did have my Martindale 6.0 wheels, which are some of the most aero and smoothest rolling wheels I’ve ever used.

toone-beforestartHere’s me and my bike before the start … Mercx style!

The race started with a neutral roll-out, but then it became obvious (to me at least) that there is a problem in trying to separate everyone in a non-drafting race?? I was told by a few people that it would “take care of itself” within a few miles – but there was still basically an awkward group together near the end of the first 25 mile lap. I took off and passed everyone so that I could give Kristine something to cheer for and not get caught up waiting on others to queue up in the slow 10mph section through the start/finish. Going through the start/finish plus my acceleration split the group up. I led for the next half lap until someone on a recumbent very gradually reeled me in. I dropped back behind him to what I hope was a legal follow distance of something in the neighborhood of 75-100 feet and tried to match my pace to his. This lasted for most of that lap until in pretty close succession a second recumbent who had been gradually closing the gap finally caught up to me and then simultaneously another rider (full TT bike, aero helmet, and disc wheel) passed me.

This was towards the end of the second lap. For the third lap, one of the recumbents stopped for an extended period so it was just me, the first recumbent, and the TT rider who set out at nearly the same time. I was in third position keeping an eye on what the other two were doing up the road. It’s deceiving on such a flat course that it looks like they are drafting, but I realized eventually that what they were doing is exchanging positions every 10-15 minutes within what looked like all the acceptable parameters. This seemed like a good idea because you got a bit of a draft during the pass so I sped up to catch up to them and immediately passed both of them. Eventually the recumbent passed me and a few minutes later so did the TT rider. Both of these “passes” gave me a bit of a break as you got a bit of a draft when they pulled over in front of you. It’s only a few seconds worth of drafting, but it is within the rules and it gives you a good mental break.

In third position, I dropped off the pace a bit but after a few miles I started catching back up to them when I felt like they were slowing down. I moved to pass both of them again. I made it past the TT rider who was falling off the pace a bit with no problem, but when I started to pass the recumbent a few minutes later, he jacked his speed up to match mine as I went by him. I thought that was interesting so I pushed even harder and harder eventually topping out at close to 30 mph before I realized that he absolutely didn’t want me to pass him. This all took about a minute and then I said to myself “forget it, you can have it” and let him go up the road. This was all about a mile or two before the finish of the third lap.

The recumbent rider stopped for an extended period after this lap, and I kept going so that meant I led from that point about 75 miles into the race until about mile 200 when I made an extended stop to use the bathroom, change clothes, eat, and rest. Leading up to mile 200 I pushed it really hard because I thought I had a legitimate shot at breaking the 9 hour mark for 200 miles given that the first 100 miles was in less than 4.5 hours. Unfortunately, I missed the mark by about 20 minutes and paid dearly for my hard effort later when I got tired. During my extended stop after 8 laps, eventual winner Brian Jastrebsky caught and passed me. I would catch him a couple laps later, and we ended up riding side by side for a bit chatting about racing and our backgrounds. It was a huge mental break to have someone to talk to for a while. I’m not sure how long we were together (maybe 15-20 minutes), but eventually I got a phone call from my kids back home in Alabama before they were going to bed so I fell off the pace to chat with them. Definitely a highlight of the race for me.

I never caught back up to Brian because I think my earlier efforts during the first 200 miles really started to catch back up to me, and I couldn’t hold more than about 150-175 watts consistently any more. I knew when I was pushing the pace really hard earlier that it was a big “no-no”, but it is something I wanted to do because how often do you get a chance to set those kinds of speed records for that distance??? For the Race Across America, I’m going to have to be more disciplined and keep my pace and effort under control even when I get uber-excited about racing and riding.

“In case you’re wondering what @kartoone76 looks like 20 hours into a race… still managing a tired smile, munching on a homemade rice cake (thanks Feedzone cookbook! These were the go-to food when his stomach went downhill). #myhusbandisepic”

One of the things I struggled with after about 18 hours was queasiness. I’ve done several long extended 22+ hour rides, one 24 hour race, and a 32 hour race (516 miles) and never had stomach problems, but about 18 hours into this race I kept on feeling like I was going to throw up if I turned my head too often to see if any riders were catching up to me. Even during this time of nausea, I was able to chow down on the peanut butter and jelly rice cakes that Kristine made at the end of each lap. I also would get one bottle of coke and one bottle of water (I stopped drinking gatorade about 16 hours into the race) and two energy gels. This was my nutrition very consistently for the last 150 miles or so of the race.

The picture above is right about the time that eventual 2nd place finisher Ray Brown caught up to me in the rest area. I watched from a chair next to our car as he pulled in to refill his bottles and rest for a minute. I left shortly afterwards and about halfway through the lap, he came flying by me. He was so much fresher than I was nearly 21 hours into the race. In the ensuing 3 hours of the race, he would pull almost exactly half a lap ahead of me (13 miles) almost catching the first place winner in the process!

The beauty of starting a 24 hour race at 7AM is that you are basically racing to the sunrise the next day. If you start the race later at say 10 or 11AM, then just having the sun come up doesn’t mean you are almost done. But with this race, as the day started to get brighter you got physical confirmation every second that the race was almost over. This picture above was on the final half lap that I did. Another nice thing about the setup of this particular race is that you could ride all the way out to 24 hours and report your finishing location. I worked it out in my head with about 2 laps to go that I would probably finish somewhere at the farthest out point of the course — and that’s exactly what happened!

One final picture to include before all my data is one I snapped of the motocross race that happened late in the afternoon carrying on into one of the night laps of our race. Even on the first lap at 7 in the morning, there was some activity at the track. Each lap as we passed the course, there was more activity. Eventually racers started to show up, but they were still working on the track so they were riding their dirt bikes around in the parking lot. Late in the day, about the time the storm started to pass through the course, the race started and I came around one lap to see dirt bikes flying over the jumps. The next lap I was fortunate to see the checkered flag out for one of the races. There must have been more races, though, because they were still racing during the first night lap. It was all over by the second night lap, and people were leaving the course. A lap or two later, the last clean-up crew worker was leaving, and the lights at the track were turned off. It was very cool to see the evolution of a motocross event from start to finish while racing our own race right by the track!

LAP DATA
Lap	Speed		HR	Power	Time
1	23.6 mi/h	148bpm	202W 	1:04:02
2	22.5 mi/h	146bpm	223W 	1:07:09
3	23.2 mi/h	151bpm	236W 	1:05:04
4	22.7 mi/h	148bpm	227W 	1:06:24
5	21.9 mi/h	148bpm	218W 	1:08:46
6	21.7 mi/h	146bpm	209W 	1:09:31
7	21.4 mi/h	143bpm	200W 	1:10:36
8	21.2 mi/h	144bpm	201W 	1:11:02
9	20.9 mi/h	137bpm	186W 	1:12:15
10	20.3 mi/h	135bpm	185W 	1:14:18
11	20.2 mi/h	133bpm	177W 	1:14:43
12	20.0 mi/h	127bpm	176W 	1:15:38
13	19.5 mi/h	122bpm	168W 	1:17:33
14	18.2 mi/h	114bpm	143W 	1:22:56
15	17.6 mi/h	110bpm	134W 	1:25:55
16	17.3 mi/h	109bpm	132W 	1:27:04
17	17.4 mi/h	110bpm	134W 	1:26:52
RIDE AND SHIFTING STATISTISTICS
http://di2stats.com/rides/view/211
# Total shifts		2694
# Front shifts		77
# Rear shifts		2617
Time b/t shifts		29.9 seconds
Elapsed time		23:58:39  
Moving time		22:22:46  
Distance		444.41 mi.  
Ascent			820 ft  
Descent			866 ft  
Climbing ratio		54.18 (miles per 100 feet climbed)
Climbing rate		37 ft/hour  
Avg/max speed		19.86 / 29.45 mph  
Avg/nrm/max pow		177 / 189 / 558 watts  
Avg/max HR		131 / 180 bpm  
Avg/max cadence		74 / 113 rpm  

di2stats.com - gear shifting pie chartdi2stats.com – gear shifting pie chart – click to view more statistics

Annotated heartrate/power/speed plot (click to enlarge)Annotated heartrate/power/speed plot (click to enlarge)

hrsumm

August 27, 2014 at 6:42 am Leave a comment

fi’zi:k ambassador

Velocita fi'zi:k ambassador

Very, very happy to announce that I’ve been selected to be a fi’zi:k ambassador. As a cycling adventure racing addict as well as a geeky computer scientist, how cool is it that I get to promote products specific for racers and competitive enthusiasts made by a company with all kinds of funky punctuation in their name?!

Already, I’ve learned that they make more than just saddles and bar tape … shoes, bars, seatposts, and stems are also part of the fi’zi:k brand. Not only that, but they have developed something called the spine concept which is designed to match up all the right products for your desired level of comfort/performance based on your flexibility and racing/riding goals. Check out their whole line-up and the spine concept here: http://www.fizik.com/en/

I’ll be participating and racing in the Roswell, Atlanta race on October 19th of the Gran Fondo Italia series promoted by fi’zi:k. The race series also includes races in Beverly Hills on September 28th, Miami on November 9th, and Rio de Janeiro on November 16th. Check out the series here: http://thegranfondoitalia.com/

fizik-web

August 11, 2014 at 10:46 am Leave a comment

To the beach (and back)!

We just got back from a really fun beach vacation … definitely the best beach vacation we’ve ever had. As long distance training, I decided to ride down to the beach via a route that would take me over Alabama and Florida’s highest points in a single, long ride. Kristine suggested that I also ride back home, so that meant no need to ride at all during the week, which meant we really got to enjoy a beach vacation without trying to work in rides. I’ve included a write-up of my “there and back again” rides after the screenshots of instagram pics from the beach. These aren’t clickable so just scroll and squint!

Beach cruising with the family

Some swamp forest trail riding

Fun times at the beach with my family

We brought the kids’ bikes down with us, but Kristine and I rented beach cruisers from Big Fish. I took Josiah on some fun exploring rides through some cool single track in Deer Lake and Point Washington state forests. We had a blast at the beach spending most of our time on boogie boards trying to ride waves. I went on a solo beach cruiser ride through Point Washington late one evening and ended up nearly getting lost, running into lots of spiders, scootering myself through some giant mud puddles after throwing sticks and rocks into the water and along the side to check for snakes, and finding some flowy singletrack (the greenway trail) – in other words, it was all kinds of awesome!

To the beach – 309 miles via AL and FL highest spots

I wanted to ride to the beach, but I also wanted to try to find the hilliest route possible. Then I thought, why not ride over to Mount Cheaha and take AL-49 south. I knew that AL-49 came into the back of Cheaha, but I wasn’t sure how far south it went. Sure enough, that single state highway covers about 85 miles of the southward bound journey going through mostly rural areas of Alabama (with the exception of Dadeville and Lake Martin, which was just a mess). See route map below:

To the beach - 309 miles, 14 counties via Alabama and Florida's high pointsTo the beach – 309 miles, 14 counties via Alabama and Florida high points

My plan was to leave at midnight Saturday morning and try to make it to the beach by about 10PM Saturday evening. Complicating this plan was two things: rain and a bee sting. The bee sting happened earlier in the day on Friday when I was going for an easy ride around town. I reacted immediately to it (see pic below), but I expected that it would calm down by the time I needed to leave to ride to the beach.

“Bee sting about a minute afterwards (top) and then 10 minutes later (bottom).”

Instead of calming down, it got slightly worse. I kept it elevated horizontally with ice on it most of the rest of the day as I worked on the couch with my laptop. By midnight, it wasn’t any better, but it wasn’t necessarily that much worse either … until I started to ride in the rain. If it was raining, I was going to wait until later to leave, but there was a large break in the storm system according to the radar. So even though there was a heavy rain mist, I decided to head out anyway. I got completely soaked by the time I left my neighborhood, but then there was a nice 75 mile break in the rain all the way to the base of Cheaha at which point I got hit by the first of several rain showers that would hit me over the rest of the ride. Even though the rain was annoying, I would say I spent a good 60% of the day dry and only 40% wet. Not too bad a trade-off considering how cool the temps stayed (in the 60s and 70s all day).

The problem with the rain and the bee sting is that I think my leg got infected either from the sting or from road grime getting into the hole where the stinger was. My initial route included a lot of major roads that were really well paved. But once I started to make my way over to Talladega and Mount Cheaha, I started to pick up some rougher roads. Each bump reverberated in my right leg and increased the swelling. By the time I had made it to the top of Cheaha, my leg was really swollen and sore from my knee all the way down into my ankle.

“Off to a rainy start, but it’s stopped for a few minutes now.” Saturday at 12:43AM, Vestavia Dr view of Homewood and Birmingham

My first stop of the day came at the top of Mt Cheaha shortly before sunrise. It was raining, cloudy, and very windy, but I had made it to the top of the highest point in Alabama with lots of energy and a long downhill section ahead. At this point, I was still optimistic of making it all the way to the beach on schedule. I only stopped for a few minutes to take pictures and instagram my progress.

“Alabama’s highest point – cheaha lookout tower. The wind is roaring up here.” Saturday at 5:22AM, Mount Cheaha, highest point in Alabama at 2407′.

My second stop of the day was for breakfast at Jack’s in Lineville, Alabama where I could see in the full light of day how much my leg had swollen. Plus, the first 15 miles of AL-49 had some rough chip and seal to make things worse.

“Lineville, AL for breakfast 100 miles in … my bee sting from yesterday has completely swollen my lower leg.” Saturday at 6:27AM, Lineville, AL, Jack’s

After an excellent breakfast and a chance to prop up my leg, I was ready to go again … although standing on my leg with all the blood rushing back into it felt like a bunch of pins and needles. Complicating my departure from Lineville, was a long five mile graded section of AL-49 that had not been paved. It was really rough, but not so rough that you couldn’t go fast – which meant that I either went fast quite painfully over the gravel or put on the brakes on the downhills. With just under 300 miles still left to ride, I wasn’t going to brake on any of the downhills. Eventually, I reached a section where the wrong side of the road had already been paved. There wasn’t great visibility, but where it was long enough to see whether cars were coming ahead or behind me I would hop over to the wrong side and ride the smooth road until either the visibility dropped off or I could see a car coming. This lasted a few more miles until the next state highway intersection.

I kept going on AL-49 south, but now both sides of the road were good pavement. The next 30 miles were awesome … beautiful rolling roads across the Tallapoosa River at the Horsehoe Bend National Military Park … all the way until I hit US-280 again in Dadeville. Then a lot of things happened at once … first, it started pouring down rain. Second, the traffic on 280 was awful even for the mile I had to ride on it. I stopped at a Rite-Aid and recharged devices while I went back into the pharmacy and talked to a very nice pharmacist who said I should get a topical cortisone cream for my leg and some non-drowsy claritin to try to help with the bee sting. I rubbed a LOT of the cream on my leg, and that helped the itching completely but didn’t do much for the internal pain.

“At rite aid to try to do something about the swelling in my leg. Crazy bee sting from yesterday!” Saturday at 9:22AM, Dadeville, AL, Rite-aid

The next 10 miles of AL-49 from Dadeville down past Lake Martin were fast, but awful. Traffic was bad, the road was rutted with bumps. Eventually, though, the traffic turned off on AL-50 and AL-14, and the pavement got a lot better. The rain had stopped; the roads were smooth; and there were lots of steep hills leading to another crossing of the Tallapoosa River. I was having a blast again all the way across I-85, which is the official end of AL-49 and the beginning of Co Rd 49 for another few miles before dead ending into US-80 (which has lots of sentimental value I won’t get into here).

I took US-80 for a couple miles with no problems, but then the County Road I was going to take south (US-80 is an east/west highway) had a bridge out. I asked a guy in a really large pick-up truck who pulled off the highway at the county road intersection if the bridge was really out, and he said yes. He also suggested I try the next county road east on highway 80 which he thought could get me south. I took his suggestion, which was a good route option except that it was rough chip and seal, and that at the very end of it was another bridge out. Fortunately, this one involved only a short detour (one or two miles instead of miles and miles).

“Bridge out of course.” Saturday at 12:26PM, South of Tuskegee, AL, County Road

At this point, I only had about 15 miles to get to Union Springs, Alabama where I planned to have lunch. I thought I was out of food, but I had just eaten a powerbar not too long ago so I figured I could make it the rest of the way and refuel there. I started down US-29 south on perfectly smooth pavement with light traffic (but very fast traffic) and proceeded to get slower and slower. I was bonking and only made it halfway there when I had flashbacks to a ride several years ago in Indiana in November when I bonked in the middle of a heavy cold downpour. This time, the sun was out a bit with temps having risen maybe into the upper 70s. But the feeling of no energy was identical. In Indiana, I had just stopped pedaling and coasted to a stop unsure how I was going to get home. I tried to hitch a ride with two cars that passed, but neither stopped. Eventually, I guess the standing there and resting was enough to let my muscles/mental strength rebuild and I was able to ride home. Here, I was at that same feeling when I reached back one more time to check my backpack and found not only a powerbar but also a powergel. I stopped and ate both of them and was able to make it the rest of the way to Union Springs.

In fact, I was feeling pretty good again by Union Springs. I stopped at Subway and had a nice lunch and a chance to ice my leg which was still getting worse. I really was out of food now, though, with 175+ miles left to ride, so I bought 8 subway cookies to take with me.

“200 miles in, union springs alabama – lunch break, my calf is swollen almost to the same size as my quad!” Saturday at 1:45PM, Union Springs, AL, Subway

Re-energized I headed south on AL-223, which was an amazing road with rolling hills, great pavement, and practically no traffic. It twisted its way south and fooled me into thinking I was going to make it around a huge thunderstorm, before the road ended up turning almost diabolically straight into it.

“It’s about to get very wet!” Saturday at 4:01PM, North of Banks, AL, AL-223

Fortunately, it didn’t rain for very long, and I made it to US-29 north, which was confusing since I was heading south, but that took me over to AL-93 through Brundidge, AL to a county road which I took over to US-231 where the county road turned into AL-87 and where I encountered some beach traffic. There wasn’t much of it, because this was still a really rural part of Alabama, but you could see the cars loaded up with bikes and beach stuff – maybe one every five minutes or so. Other than the sporadic beach traffic, AL-87 was really amazing and reminded me a lot of the rolling hills outside of Madison, Wisconsin.

My leg started to really hurt during this stretch of road, and I was desperate to stop anywhere that had some smooth concrete where I could take my shoes off without worrying about ants or gravel. I saw up ahead something I recognized from similar sights in rural Mississippi – a tiny post office building. I pulled over the road thankful for the front porch stoop at the closed post office.

“Taking a much needed break, right leg feels like it is on fire. Subway cookies smashed together – I’m contemplating eating the whole thing, paper and all.” Saturday at 6:00PM, Jack, AL, Post office

After this break, I continued on AL-87 all the way down to Elba, AL where I stopped at Burger King to refuel my camelbak with water. The restaurant was very busy, and lots of people wanted to know where I was going. I called Kristine from outside the Burger King to tell her that there was no way I was going to make it to the beach in any reasonable timeframe, so I asked her to come pick me up at the Florida high point just south of the Alabama border.

We tried to time it perfectly so that we would get there at the same time, but I ended up on a rough chip/seal road that went basically through a swamp. I thought the frogs/crickets/snakes were going to jump up out of the swamp grass beside the road when I stopped to call Kristine and update her on my progress. This rough chip/seal road went straight into a dirt road that I needed to take to get to the high point less than five miles away. My toes and leg were so sore by this point that I was afraid I wouldn’t be able to handle the dirt road and took another detour on a different chip/seal road heading straight for US-331. Each cross street was dirt, so there was no option but to ride on US-331 until Kristine protested via a phone call when she saw where I was heading that she didn’t want me riding on that road (having just driven it herself several hours earlier). I turned around and headed a few miles back to the dirt road intersection where I waited for her to navigate the dirt road back from the high point where she could follow me to the end. If I was unable to continue I could just hop in the car.

The dirt road was like pristine pavement compared to the chip/seal I had been on, so I had been worried for nothing. Kristine followed along behind as I navigated the dirt roads all the way to AL-52 for about half a mile, another dirt road, and finally Co Rd 285 which takes you to Lakeland Park, the highest point in Florida. I hopped in the car, and was asleep long before we made it to the beach — not even waking up until we made it to the beach house where we were staying for the week. The end!

“Why take the paved route when 5 miles of dirt is an option to get to the Florida high point.” Saturday at 9:46PM, somewhere near the AL/FL border, dirt road

“Didn’t make it all the way to the beach but very happy to have conquered two state high points in the same ride.” Saturday at 10:30PM, Lakeland Park, FL, Highest point in Florida

Beach vacation day 1 – the emergency room

I woke up on Sunday with my leg still swollen just as much as the day before and on the advice of a number of friends decided I should head to urgent care and get my leg checked out. Kristine and I headed down to Panama City Beach, which was the closest urgent care facility. After waiting an hour, we saw the doctor who took one look at my leg and said I should head to the emergency room to check for DVT (blood clots) since they didn’t have the equipment there to check for them. He saw us for less than a minute, and said he would refund our copay. I asked if we could stop for lunch first, and he said no – go to the hospital immediately.

“@kartoone76 knows how to kick off a beach vacation. Urgent care to the ER bc of his bee-sting swollen leg. Just have to rule out a blood clot (DVT) after his accident. Never a dull moment, I tell ya!” Sunday at 2PM, Panama City Beach, FL, Hospital

So we hopped back in the car and headed to Panama City (not the beach) where we were seen fairly quickly – the ultrasound came back negative for blood clots. That is a very interesting test. The technician will put the ultrasound device high up on your leg, and then squeeze the lower part of your leg. You could then audibly hear the change in blood flow in response to the squeezing. If there were clots, then you wouldn’t have been able to hear the change in blood flow because they would have been blocking the passage.

The only other two possibilities for my leg were an allergic reaction to the bee sting or cellulitis — an infection of the soft tissue. There was no way to tell for sure which it was, so the doctor treated for the cellulitis with a prescription for antibiotics and for possible allergic reaction to the bee sting with a prescription for prednisone, a corticosteroid. By the next day, the swelling had gone down and everything was back to normal.

Homeward – 333 miles via FL and AL highest spots

This write-up won’t be quite as long … I originally had planned to do a shorter 300 mile route back to Birmingham through Selma and the old state time trial course near Sprott. But when I had to cut my ride short on the way to the beach because of the bee sting, I thought I would try and do the entire 380+ mile route in reverse on the way back. This was going well until it got really hot (temps in the mid 90s for most of the day with a ton of humidity). I ended up overheating south of Dadeville, but with some extended stops and iced drinks I recovered fine. On the climb up Cheaha, I called Kristine and asked her to come pick me up in Talladega about 50 miles from home. I could have made it, but I was really sleepy having a bit of dehydration throughout the day. I’ll focus my write-up on the first part of the ride, which was all of Florida in the dark under a million stars.

I left Seagrove Beach shortly after midnight and headed down 30A straight through Seaside and Grayton Beach before turning onto Co Rd 285, US-98, and then US-331 to take the bridge over the bay. There was a lot of traffic out, and I was concerned about drunk people returning home from dinner/partying. Fortunately, everything was fine and nobody appeared to be drunk. I got off US-331 as soon as possible though and took the Black Creek shortcut over to FL-20. I was motoring with an average speed well over 21mph despite carrying nearly 100 oz of water in my camelbak plus all the tools, battery packs, cords, etc… that I would need for a 385 mile ride. I routed myself on FL-20 so that I could get to FL-81, which I knew from previous trips to Florida was quite hilly and would connect me up with Knox Hill (a 150 foot climb) where I tried to win last year’s Rapha Rising with a bazillion hill repeats.

I took several county roads north of US-90 that put me into really rural parts of Florida. The pavement was perfect, though, which meant that I could fly down some of the hills at close to 35mph. With my little headlight on its lowest setting to save battery, I kept thinking “if the bridge is out at the bottom of this hill, i’m just going to fly into the creek with the alligators”. But the bridge was never out, and the miles just ticked away. I made it 83 miles to the high point of Florida in just over 4 hours.

“At the Florida high point!” Saturday at 4:09AM, Lakeland Park, Florida high pt

Shortly after crossing the border into Alabama, I ran into my first obstacle of the day – a sign that said “road closed, 7 miles ahead, local traffic only”. What do you do in that situation? Do you gamble that you can make it across the bridge or road construction anyway? Or do you try to find a detour. Fortunately, they had put this sign at a spot where I could detour in the same general direction but several miles too far east (which would then have to be returned as well). I took the detour, which ended up being another rural road that was beautifully paved with no lights, no houses, just darkness. Through here I saw a large black animal (possibly a bear) cross the road in front of me.

“Sometimes I feel like we live in 3rd world country.” Saturday at 4:20AM, North of the AL/FL border, AL-52

Eventually, I made it back to my intended route and on northwards. There was heavy, heavy fog through most of southern Alabama — but fortunately, there was nobody out on the roads at 5AM on a Saturday morning. I made it to Elba by 6AM with an average speed of still nearly 21mph. I stopped at the same Burger King I had stopped at on the way down to Florida. By the time I left and started heading north on AL-125, the fog had started to lift and it had started to get hot. I made it to Union Springs just as the temperature really started to spike. I ended up stopping at Subway first for a breakfast sandwich, then McDonald’s to fill up my camelbak with powerade, and Dollar General to buy some suntan lotion.

Leaving Union Springs was crazy hot, and even though I was on some county roads, there was practically no shade. I stopped at a gas station at the I-85 intersection to get some iced drinks to cool off and take with me.

“One way to try to beat the heat.” Saturday at 1:09PM, I-85 intersection, AL-49

From this spot, it was a battle against the heat essentially stopping at each gas station I saw (often separated by 30 miles or more) along AL-49. I would spend 10-15 minutes cooling off and drinking cold drinks before heading north. This eventually took me far enough along in the day that the shadows started to creep across the road so that I would finally have a break from the direct sunlight.

I was worried about the unpaved portion of AL-49 that I had ridden on my southward journey a week earlier, but lo and behold they had finished paving both sides during the week while we were at the beach. So I only had a short half mile section right outside of Lineville that was still unpaved. The long climb from Lineville up to Cheaha was fine until I got to Cheaha at which point I was just out of energy. I zig-zagged my way up the mountain and called Kristine to meet me in Talladega. There were lots of people camping up on top of the mountain, plus a few miles later on the descent in Camp Mac. I kept going and made it to Talladega 333 miles and 22 hours after starting. I was ready to be done!

“Cheaha” Saturday at 8:38PM, Mt Cheaha, Highest point in Alabama

“@ktoone bailed me out in Talladega, but I am happy with the ride, two state high points again!” Saturday at 10:11PM, Talladega, McDonald’s

Here’s a topocreator map of my 12 county return trip … zoom to see lots of detail.

333 miles, 12 counties, home from the beach via Florida and Alabama high points333 miles, 12 counties, home from the beach via Florida and Alabama high points

July 28, 2014 at 2:01 pm Leave a comment

Wisconsin Racing and Riding

Pre-race pic, happy with 65th given this was only my second road event of the year.

Beautiful cool weather this year unlike last year’s scorcher, so hydration was easy. Sad that this will be the last year for Madison hosting the race, but perhaps Northern California hosting it will be a good reason to take a trip out there in 2016. Next year, however, I am aiming for a Southern California trip for the Race Across America. Already starting my training for RAAM 2015, I thought it would be good to do the race and then do a long point-to-point ride while still tired from the race. With my wife’s family in Northwestern Wisconsin, it made sense for me to ride up there from Madison for the rest of our vacation up here.

Race summary
I got a good start near the front, but not having ridden in a pack much this year I wasn’t good at keeping my position as other riders edged beside me. By the end of the neutral section I was already near the back of the field. I felt good on the Cat 3 climb to finish the lap and started feeling more comfortable moving around in the pack. On the third lap, I found myself near the back again when the field slowed down on the county road before the climb. I noticed on the previous lap that the shoulder is very nice, rideable gravel. So I ended up passing almost the entire field in the gravel. In retrospect, I wish I had attacked instead of pulling back into line because there was still a few more miles of slow riding. How epic would that have been to have attacked in the gravel in the national championship road race. Oh well!

Instead, by the time we reached the bottom of the climb on that lap I had already slid back to mid-pack. I was running out of nutrition so I asked Kristine to feed me gels on the next lap. I was near the back the next time through the climb and pulled over to grab the gels. I grabbed them with no problem and chased back onto the back of the field, but by this point the back of the field had splintered and there wasn’t enough of us to chase back on even though we tried an entire lap plus mixing it up with the large caravan of vehicles.

Many people pulled out, but Shawn Gravois (Lupus) and I soldiered on eventually catching Andy Scarano (UHC/706). Together the three of us rolled the last half lap until we caught a few more people coming off the lead group. The last person we caught was near the top of the climb, and he came back around us which was kind of the universal sign that we’re still racing. I took off up the final climb to end up finishing 65th.

Annotated heartrate plot (click to enlarge)Annotated heartrate plot for national road race (click to enlarge)

Heartrate summary - lots of time spent in zone 4 and 5

Cave of the mounds
After the race, we wanted to check out the cave of the mounds since it was right by the course … an hour long tour was worth it even though my legs were tired and my stomach very hungry. By the end of the tour, we were practically running to the car to get to the nearest place to eat. We ended up at the Grumpy Troll in Mount Horeb. Very good, in-house produced root beer and cheese curds. Mmmmm, mmmm, mmmm.

Adventure in the hills of Southwestern, Western, and Northwestern Wisconsin
After dinner I drove Kristine and the kids on some of the routes through the hills between Blue Mounds and Middleton where we were staying – including Observatory Rd – the views are spectacular. One more trip to Starbucks, and I started this blog while the kids were swimming in the hotel pool. I tried to time my sleep so that I would get exactly 3 hours of sleep (two 90 minute sleep cycles) before getting up. Unfortunately, they were playing a replay of the highlights of last year’s Tour de France so I think I only ended up with one sleep cycle.

“Heading out for a little ride across the state of Wisconsin – 1:15am” – my instagram caption from the hotel elevator as I headed out for an approx 350 mile ride through the hills of southwestern, western, and northwestern Wisconsin.

I’ve included my route map below. I tried to pick the hilliest route I could find through all the hills that was still relatively straight heading in the northwesterly direction. There were many climbs I had to skip because they went too far out of the way, but I was still surprised when I was riding at just how many hills and valleys I went through — totaling just over 20,000 feet of climbing. The upper midwest has had quite a bit of flooding problems this late spring / early summer from all the rain combined with snowmelt. This translated to many bridges being out. That makes for quite the challenge on a point-to-point ride. Only two of the bridges that were out were on my direct path. The first bridge out I came to was actually not completely out, and I was able to cross it by hanging off the side of the bridge. The second bridge was really out with no bridge left. I wouldn’t have any problems with taking my shoes and socks off and fording the water, but it was very deep mud and grass that I would need to traverse — not something I wanted to do within the first 100 miles of a 350ish mile ride. The official detour was miles and miles out of the way, so I took an unofficial detour through several miles of gravel on steep rollers, whole fields of bunnies, and endless fields of corn. Some of the other bridges out meant that the larger roads were detouring onto the route that I was already planning on taking. Fortunately, this part of Wisconsin is really rural … no cellphone coverage for over 100 miles from Blue Mounds to Sparta. Then another 100 miles of no cellphone coverage until the outskirts of Eau Claire. So the traffic was minimal pretty much the entire day.

“All kinds of awesome on a point-to-point ride” – my instagram caption at the first bridge out … before holding onto the outside of what was left of the bridge to cross the creek. They had fenced off the bridge itself well enough that I couldn’t just climb over or around the fence.

wwultra-topocreator-smwestern wisconsin – ultra resolution annotated topocreator map (click to enlarge).

western wisconsin - topocreator countieswestern wisconsin – topocreator county map (click to enlarge). my route traversed 13 counties.

Equipment
I started out at 1:15 in the morning with the moon having already set. The Milky Way galaxy was bright enough to ride through open fields with no lights on! I tried this a couple times on the climbs up to Blue Mounds which have some stretches of open fields. Absolutely amazing. I had a four light setup for negotiating some of the fast descents in the dark – rear taillight, two handlebar mounted front lights (a 200 lumen and a small 50 lumen), plus a helmet mounted 200 lumen headlight. I thought I needed to conserve battery so on all the uphills I rode with just the 50 lumen light on. Then for the faster downhills I turned on the 200 lumen light at its lowest setting, and if the descent really started to turn downhill I flipped on the helmet light at its brightest setting. It turns out I didn’t need to worry about battery at all because this far north, it starts getting light outside by about 4:30AM. By 5AM, you can ride without a light other than a blinkie light for visibility for cars. Plus, sunset isn’t until 9PM with the afterglow lasting until about 10PM!

I also had two Garmins and a cellphone to keep charged during the ride. The cellphone was the most challenging to keep charged because there was so little coverage my phone battery was constantly draining as it boosted the signal to try to find coverage — unsuccessfully. Unfortunately, we had not anticipated so much non-coverage and Kristine was tracking me online. We pretty much gave up on the tracking after Blue Mounds, and I texted her in the two towns that had coverage (Sparta and Eau Claire).

I had split the route into five separate 70 mile courses, which I loaded onto my Garmin 1000. This was my first real course test for the 1000. It followed the courses with no problems, no crashes, no glitches. I know from much experience that my Garmin 800 cannot follow long courses with hundreds of turns without eventually crashing. But since I was doing all the navigation on my 1000, I was able to leave the 800 running without messing with it at all. It made it the entire 315 mile ride without crashing. I had to recharge both Garmins twice. I brought an Anker Astro Mini charger and a Gomadic Solar charger. I completely drained the Anker keeping the cellphone charged but it made it the entire day (21 hours) with a large part of the day spent searching for signals.

The Gomadic I split between the 800 and 1000 and was able to keep both charged although both ended the day with low battery and my Gomadic also with its low battery signal on. Also, in Sparta I knew that I might need extra battery so I bought a wall charger which I also used to charge the cellphone during an extended Starbucks stop in Eau Claire.

Pictures
I’ll finish this post just with some pictures showing the scenery and describing the road as mixed conditions, a lot of smooth pavement with minimal cracking, the occasional perfectly smooth road, some larger cracks on a few of the heavier traveled roads, a few rough gravel roads, and one smooth fast dirt road which I think was being prepped for paving (county ww outside of eau claire). The terrain was steep rolling hills, long gradual climbs and descents in river valleys, plus the occasional long and steep cat 3 climb up to some of the higher ridges. Usually the top of the ridge would be flat to gently rolling with sweeping views of other ridges and valleys dotted with farms, barns, silos, forests … in other words flat out beautiful.

Western Wisconsin annotated heartrate plot (click to enlarge - look at all the steep hills)Western Wisconsin annotated heartrate plot (click to enlarge – look at all the steep hills)

July 6, 2014 at 2:08 pm 1 comment

24 hour mountain bike nationals – data and details

My adventure out west to race 24 hour mountain bike nationals led to a 7th place finish and lots of lessons learned for next year’s Race Across America. Here is all my heartrate data and a map annotating the course as well as a general description of the course. The lap times on my heartrate graph do not include time spent resting between laps, so this gives a better picture of how my legs/body were feeling on any given lap than the official lap times which include time spent in the pit between laps. One of the things I was really happy with for this race is that after an hour and a half of sleep, I put in negative splits on my last four laps. In other words, each of my last four laps was faster than the one before. That is very encouraging for RAAM how my body was able to recover and respond after such a short rest.

Heartrate zone summaryHeartrate zone summary

Annotated heartrate plot (click to enlarge and see lap times)Annotated heartrate plot (click to enlarge and see lap times)

Annotated topocreator map of the entire course. One of the advantages of the topocreator map over Google terrain view is that it is very easy to pick out the high points on a course like this with all its gentle sloping.Annotated topocreator map of the entire course. One of the advantages of the topocreator map over Google terrain view is that it is very easy to pick out the high points on a course like this with all its gentle sloping. Click to enlarge. Or you may also download a high resolution version of this map.

This race was so well-organized by the folks at Zia Rides, and one of the great things about the course was having big red mile markers every mile on the course. This meant that you could break the course up into smaller sections and tackle each section independently – super important for a 24 hour race where you are looking for those boosts of achievement when you are super tired … so reaching the next mile marker meant you were one mile closer to the end of the lap. On the topocreator map above, I have labeled each of the miles in black M1, M2, etc…

We started the race out on the wide dirt road so that we would have a chance to sort out positions before the start of the singletrack. I had been worried all week that we would start in the campground under the finishing banner, which would mean a very short dash of 100 meters or so to the start of the singletrack before the dirt road. This singletrack was a climb through the campground followed by a descent to a bridge with a 90 degree turn entering and exiting the bridge – then more descending down through a cow field before a gentle climb up to the dirt road. When they announced during our pre-race meeting that the start would be on the dirt road, this was a huge relief that I wouldn’t be pressured to going really fast through the opening singletrack.

Opening singletrack through the cow field … storm approaching on Friday’s ride.

Still, it is tough to get everything organized for a 24 hour race and I didn’t hop onto my bike to ride over to the start at 11AM until after 10:30AM. Jake Wade (friend from ultracx racing) and I rode over past the start together and then out to the start of the singletrack and back as warmup. Even though we were back at the start by 10:45, there was already a ton of people lined up. So I started in the third or fourth row thinking that it was going to be tough to make up much ground before the start of the singletrack. Fortunately, I was on the righthand side and there was a 30+mph crosswind blowing from the left. I passed a ton of people and settled into line somewhere in the top 10 before the start of the singletrack.

The opening singletrack dropped down briefly before climbing steeply for about a quarter mile. Then it rolled along the side of a hill eventually making a 90 degree turn to head back down into the valley. But before hitting the valley, the trail went straight up a rock ledge. This was totally rideable as long as you had some momentum. I was worried that if you weren’t far enough forward somebody would goof this up and everybody behind would have to walk. I’m not sure if that happened or not because I was far enough forward that everybody could ride it. Dropping off the ledge on the other side was a dip down to a bicycle-specific cattle guard to take you into the long climb to the top of the course.

Collage of pics from my first ride on the course after arriving on Wednesday.

This climb started out very steeply but then rolled a bit before settling into a gradual gradient for several miles. The gradual climb was easy and non-technical except you did have to pick your line carefully to avoid riding over some big rocks. Those rocks were also rideable, but for a 24 hour race you are looking to save every ounce of energy and save your body from as many rock-jolts as possible … so you wanted to ride around those rocks instead of over them. The climb was about half-way over by the time you made it to the cat-tail pond where the junior course split off to the right.

The cattail pond between mile 5 and 6.

After the pond, the course continued to climb through miles 6 and 7. Topping out for the first time shortly after mile 7, there was a gentle fast downhill with lots of sandy turns before a gradual climb up through mile 8. This process repeated itself several times through the rim trail until you finally made it to mile marker 10 which was the high point on the course and the start of a long gradual descent peppered with a short steep climb at mile 11 and a few other small rollers. The climb at mile 11 started out with a short rock slab section followed by a turn straight up a steep hill. I rode it every lap except lap 8 where I was so exhausted I walked the whole section (including the flat parts) just to change up the pace a bit and give my hands a rest from gripping the handlebars.

One of my favorite parts of the course was shortly after this short steep climb – the singletrack continued climbing for a bit before diving back down one more time into a gulley followed by another steep climb on the other side. I figured out in my pre-rides that even with the rocks and roots on the climb, your best bet for this was to fly down the hill and hit the gulley at full speed. You popped up over the rocks and were more than halfway out of the gulley before you even had to pedal. Almost immediately after this, you rode straight towards a property line fence. The singletrack followed the fence very closely for about a mile. Each lap I looked forward to this fence because it meant you had about a mile of easy, smooth, fun riding before the rocky section of the downhill and then the long “berma” section of downhill. I didn’t get any pictures of this part of the course in any of my pre-rides because I never wanted to stop to take one.

The first major jump on the downhill section came right before mile 14 (red mileage marker visible in the middle of this picture) and was followed immediately by a 90 degree turn. Early on when you were fresh you had to make sure to keep your speed under control so that you didn’t endo on the landing.

The strava segment for this long downhill is called “Berma” presumably because after the jumps you have a number of partially banked turns. The dirt was quite loose so you had to get your line right or risk having your wheel washout. I had a couple close calls during my pre-rides, but by race day had nailed it down pretty good. Once you hit the bottom of Berma, you basically had a 4 mile rolling climb to the finish. The rollers were pretty steep (both up and down) so you got to do a lot of resting on the downhill parts which made the uphill sections more manageable after you had been racing for a long time.

The last mile was some narrow, bumpy singletrack alongside a beautifully paved road. No paved road for the race course, however, with 18 miles of single track and just over a mile of dirt road for a grand total of 19.15 miles per lap. In this picture the righthand side is looking up towards the campground / finishing area and the left side is looking back down the final mile of singletrack alongside the paved road.

That takes you through a single lap of the course. I was fortunate to pre-ride the course four times during the week leading up to the race and then twelve times during the race for a grand total of approximately 325 miles of singletrack — easily surpassing any kind of all-time personal record of number of miles of singletrack ridden in a single week. The course was perfect for a 24 hour mtb race, fast, diverse, safe, fun, and challenging. I’m very sad that USA Cycling is dropping this event off the national championship calendar, but the event was so well run we are definitely going to have to make this a future family vacation sometime in the next few years … maybe even next year!

June 28, 2014 at 8:52 pm Leave a comment

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Quick reference stats

Anaerobic Threshold:
Power:315 watts
Heart rate:180 bpm
Maximums:
Power:1097 watts (5s)
Heart rate:198 bpm (5s)
AT power estimated by critical power curve in Golden Cheetah, which predicts I should be able to maintain 315 watts for 1 hour.

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